Niccolo Machiavelli Quotes - BrainyQuote

Prison sentence
Shakur began serving his prison sentence at Clinton Correctional Facility later that February. Soon after, his multi-platinum album, Me Against the World, was released. Shakur has the distinction of being the only artist with an album at number one on the charts while serving a prison sentence. From jail, he married his long-time girlfriend, Keisha Morris. He also had time to pursue reading, delving into the works of Niccolò Machiavelli, Sun Tzu’s The Art of War and even wrote a screenplay titled Live 2 Tell while incarcerated.

Niccolò Machiavelli - Wikiquote

Niccolo Machiavelli. Biography of Niccolo Machiavelli and a searchable collection of works.

Life Lessons From Niccolò Machiavelli – Return Of Kings

The Prince is a simple and straight forward political guidebook for the ruling of autocratic regimes based on the first-hand experiences of Niccolo Machiavelli.

Why did Machiavelli write The Prince

The Prince is a simple and straight forward political guidebook for the ruling of autocratic regimes based on the first-hand experiences of Niccolo Machiavelli. The Prince was originally published in 1513 and represented an important departure from previous thought. It is seen as part of a larger transition from medieval scholasticism to Renaissance humanism.

Who Was Niccolò Machiavelli? | Mises Institute

Collects together in English translation nearly all of Machiavelli’s writings. Although the renderings tend toward the literary, rather than the literal, the volume is extremely useful to readers who lack knowledge of Italian.

Niccolo Machiavelli - Biography and Works. Search …

For sheer volume and intensity, studies of have far exceeded those directed at Machiavelli's though the latter work has been acknowledged an essential companion piece to the former. All of the author's subsequent studies treating history, political science, and military theory stem from this voluminous dissertation containing the most original thought of Machiavelli. Less flamboyant than and narrower in its margin for interpretation, the contains Machiavelli's undisguised admiration for ancient governmental forms, and his most eloquent, thoroughly explicated republicanism. Commentators have noted the presence of a gravity and skillful rhetoric that at times punctuate but are in full evidence only in that work's final chapter, a memorable exhortation to the Medicis to resist foreign tyranny. The also presents that methodical extrapolation of political theory from historical documentation which is intermittent in Max Lerner has observed that "if is great because it gives us the grammar of power for a government, are great because they give us the philosophy of organic unity not in a government but in a state, and the conditions under which alone a culture can survive."It has been deemed not at all incongruous that an intellect immersed in historical circumstance and political impetus should so naturally embrace comedy as well. For Machiavelli regarded comedy exactly as he conceived history: an interplay of forces leading unavoidably to a given result. Machiavelli's his only work in the comedic genre, clearly reflected this parallel. De Sanctis has remarked that "under the frivolous surface [of ] are hidden the profoundest complexities of the inner life, and the action is propelled by spiritual forces as inevitable as fate. It is enough to know the characters to guess the end." The drama's scenario concerns Callimaco's desire to bed Lucrezia, the beautiful young wife of a doddering fool, Nicia, who is obsessed with begetting a son. Masquerading as a doctor, Callimaco advises Nicia to administer a potion of mandrake to Lucrezia to render her fertile, but also warns that the drug will have fatal implications for the first man to have intercourse with her. He slyly suggests to Nicio that a dupe be found for this purpose. Persuaded by her confessor, a knavish cleric, to comply with her husband's wishes, the virtuous Lucrezia at last allows Callimaco into her bed, where he has no difficulty convincing her to accept him as her lover on a more permanent basis. Tales of this sort" replete with transparent devices, mistaken identities, and cynical, often anticlerical overtones" were already commonplace throughout Europe by the Middle Ages, though critics have remarked that Machiavelli lent freshness to even this hackneyed material. Sydney Anglo has commended his "clear, crisp repartee" and ability "to nudge our ribs at improprieties and double-meanings," despite characterization that is "rudimentary, haphazard, and inconsistent, with even protagonists going through their motions like automata." Macaulay, on the other hand, has applauded the play's "correct and vigorous delineation of human nature."

The Prince, Niccolo Machiavelli - LibriVox

It seems that translations of are published almost annually, making it difficult to compare and recommend one over the very many others. and may be commended for including helpful resources beyond the translation itself. Virtually every word written by Machiavelli has received one or more rendering into English, These may be found, for instance, in , , and . Nearly the entirety of Machiavelli’s corpus (including his , and minor prose and poetic and theatrical works) are translated by Allan Gilbert in the three volumes of . Machiavelli’s Italian is notoriously difficult to capture in translation, however, due to his highly ambiguous and playful use of language, among other factors. Even readers who have facility in the original find his expression challenging to comprehend. Thus, it is useful to compare translations with the original Italian, if one has the linguistic facility to do so. One widely available and often-cited edition is , translated by Mario Martelli.