Variations of the word Love - Margaret Atwood - …

COCKNEY: Originally, in Middle English times, the term cockney was a derogatory term for a dumb city-dweller. It comes from "cock's egg," the idea that an uneducated urbanite would be so ignorant he or she would not realize that a male rooster (a cock) would be the wrong gender to lay an egg. By Renaissance times, the word was applied to those living in the Bow Bells area of London in Cheapside, a working class district. Today, the term implies most strongly the spoken dialect of that area. Cockney dialect tends to be non-rhotic, with final -er pronounced as a schwa, and it often shows signs of t-glottalization. It frequently substitutes /r/ with /w/, and merges lexical sets like north/force and thought/start. The imprecise term Estuary English refers to spoken English in the southeast of Britain that merges linguistic traits of and Cockney, and recent dialect shift that appears to be spreading across the island. See also , below.

Variations on the Word Love by Margaret Atwood - …

Variations on the Word Love - YouTube

Maddie's English Blog: Variations on the Word Love

CATCH: A lyric poem or song meant to be sung as a round, with the words arranged in each line so that the audience will hear a hidden (often humorous or ribald) message as the groups of singers sing their separate lyrics and space out the wording of the poem. For example, one might write a song in which the first line contained the words "up," the word "look" appears in the middle of the third line, the word "dress" appears in the second line, and the word "her" appears in the middle of the fourth line. When the song or poem is sung as a round by four groups of singers, the word order and timing is arranged so that the singers create the hidden phrase "look up her dress" as they sing, to the amusement of the audience as they listen to an otherwise innocent set of lyrics. Robert Herrick's "To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time" is an example of a catch, and when William Lawes adapted the poem to music for Milton's masque Comus, it became one of the most popular drinking songs of the 1600s (Damrosche 844-45).

Analysis of the Poem "Variations on the Word Love"

CARMEN: (Lat. "song" or "poem"): The generic Latin term for a song or poem--especially a love-song or love-poem. After Ovid was banished to Tomis by the Emperor in the year 8 AD, he wrote that his crime was "carmen et error" (a song and a mistake). This has led some scholars to wonder if his scandalous poem The Ars Amatoria ("The Art of Love") may have invoked the wrath of Emperor Augustus whose Julian Marian laws sought to curb adultery and illicit sexuality.

541: Variations on the Word Love - a poem a day - …
“Variations on the Word Love” Margaret Atwood This is a word we use to plug holes with

And I do have two sweet variations on the tune

Analysis of the Poem "Variations on the Word Love"The writer of the poem Margaret Atwood was born in November 18, 1939 inOttawa, Ontario, Canada

Excerpt from Slouching Towards Bethlehem: ‘John Wayne…

04.09.2009 · Variations on the Word Love- Margaret Atwood The subject of this poem is separated into to two stanzas

Literary Terms and Definitions C - Carson-Newman College