Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson (1824–1863)

In 1861, as the broke out, Jackson became a drill master for some of the many new recruits in the . On April 27, 1861, Virginia Governor ordered Jackson to take command at , where he would assemble and command the famous "", consisting of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th, and 33rd Virginia Infantry regiments. He got his nickname "Stonewall" from the fact that he and his brigade never retreated but always stood as a stone wall. All of these units were from the region of Virginia, where Jackson located his throughout the first two years of the war. Jackson became known for his relentless drilling of his troops; he believed discipline was vital to success on the battlefield. Following the on May 24, he was promoted to on June 17.

Thomas 'Stonewall' Jackson - Berean Bible Heritage

Family life:Stonewall Jackson was born as the third child in his family.

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson - West Virginia


American Civil War
In 1861, as the American Civil War broke out, Jackson became a drill master for some of the many new recruits in the Confederate Army. On April 27, 1861, Virginia Governor John Letcher ordered Colonel Jackson to take command at Harpers Ferry, where he would assemble and command the famous "Stonewall Brigade", consisting of the 2nd, 4th, 5th, 27th, and 33rd Virginia infantry regiments. All of these units were from the Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia. He was promoted to brigadier general on June 17.

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Thomas Jackson was the third child of (1798 – 1831) and Jonathan Jackson (1790 – 1826), an . Both of Jackson's parents were natives of Virginia. The family already had two young children and were living in , in what is now West Virginia, when Thomas was born. He was named for his maternal grandfather.


Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (January 21, 1824 ..

Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (January 21, 1824 – May 10, 1863) was a general during the , and probably the most well-known Confederate commander after General . His includes the of 1862 and his service as a corps commander in the under Robert E. Lee. Confederate accidentally shot him at the on May 2, 1863, which the general survived, albeit with the loss of an arm to amputation. However, he died of complications of eight days later. His death was a severe setback for the Confederacy, affecting not only its military prospects, but also the morale of its army and of the general public.

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Childhood
Jackson was the third child of Julia Beckwith (née Neale) Jackson (1789–1831) and Jonathan Jackson (1790–1826), an attorney. Both of Jackson's parents were natives of Virginia. The family already had two young children and were living in Clarksburg, in what is now West Virginia, when Thomas, their third son, was born.

More info on Thomas Jonathan Jackson Wikis

Thomas Jonathan Jackson was the great-grandson of John Jackson (1715 or 1719 – 1801) and Elizabeth (also known as Elizabeth Comings and Elizabeth Needles) (1723 – 1828). John Jackson was born a Protestant in , , . While living in , he was convicted of the capital crime of larceny for stealing £170; the judge at the sentenced him to a seven-year in America. Elizabeth, a strong, blonde woman over 6 feet (1.8 m) tall, born in London, was also convicted of larceny in an unrelated case for stealing 19 pieces of silver, jewelry, and fine lace, and received a similar sentence. They both were transported on the prison ship Litchfield, which departed London in May 1749 with 150 convicts. John and Elizabeth met on board and were in love by the time the ship arrived at . Although they were sent to different locations in Maryland for their indentures, the couple married in July 1755.

Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson - Smithsonian Institution

It was a classic military campaign of surprise and maneuver. Jackson pressed his army to travel 646 miles (1,040 km) in 48 days of marching and won five significant victories with a force of about 17,000 against a combined force of 60,000. Stonewall Jackson's reputation for moving his troops so rapidly earned them the nickname "." He became the most celebrated soldier in the Confederacy (until he was eventually eclipsed by Lee) and lifted the morale of the Southern public.

Stonewall Jackson - Famous People

Military historians consider Jackson to be one of the most gifted tactical commanders in . His Valley Campaign and his envelopment of the right wing at Chancellorsville are studied worldwide even today as examples of innovative and bold leadership. He excelled as well in other battles: the (where he received his famous nickname "Stonewall"), the , and . Jackson was not universally successful as a commander, however, as displayed by his weak and confused efforts during the around in 1862.