Types of trusts - May. 29, 2015 - CNNMoney

The Hollywood Bigots and Hypocrites--As David Prindle points out, "[a]s liberals, Hollywood decision-makers are in fact in favor of equal access to employment. But their habitual mode of operation--making deals with their friends--disadvantages people who are members of groups less likely to have personal relationships with a player." As can be seen from the review of who controls Hollywood (see the chapter "Who Really Controls Hollywood") and who many of these "players" are, it is clear that the disadvantaged in Hollywood are all of those who are not the politically liberal and not very religious Jewish males of European heritage. A former president of the Women in Film organization, Marcy Kelly " . . . sums up the plight of all non-young, non-white, non-males trying to get started in films and television, 'You may have all the skills in the world and

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Malachi Devotionals & Sermon Illustrations | Precept Austin

Viktor's younger son by the first marriage, Franz Adolf(1724-84), married on Oct 19, 1762 Josefa vonHasslingen,daughter of Johann Wolfgang, of Silesian nobility. She was raisedto the rank of countess by the Emperor, against which Franz Adolf'sbrothers asked the Reichshofrat for a declaration that this elevationwould not be to their disadvantage in any way (Sep 4, 1766)but theywere rebuffed(9 Jan 1767). The two children of that marriage wereconsidered dynasts, and the daughter married a prince ofHesse-Philippsthal. The surviving son ofthatmarriage, Friedrich Franz (1769-1807) married Caroline Westarp; thedescendantsof that marriage (still extant) were made Grafen von Westarp inPrussia.[Pütter 313-14, 320]

Family System Theory: Definition and Changes Over …

Getting closer to one of the main theses of the earlier chapter ("Who Really Controls Hollywood"), investigative reporter Terry Pristin suggests that one of the reasons for Hollywood's tendency to churn out homogeneous films is the homogeneity in the people who make such films. The Pristin article's subtitle is: "Who can you trust better than kin? Nobody. So, the question is: Does this old Hollywood tradition keep new blood and fresh ideas out of the movies?" The research supporting this book and its companion volumes mandates an unequivocal "yes" answer to that question. Pristin further states: " . . . clearly, nepotism works to the disadvantage of those from the outside. And some say that has consequences for moviegoers, as well as moviemakers. 'The movies pay a price for having a relatively limited view of American society,' said author Neal Gabler, noting the scarcity of blacks, women and other minorities in the studios' higher echelons. 'That's clearly to the detriment of American movies.' In other words, if movies mirror the values, interests, cultural perspectives and prejudices of their makers (as the research for this book series suggests), then as long as the people in the film industry who make the important decisions about which movies are going to be made, who gets to work on those movies and the content of such movies are relatively homogeneous, we can expect to get relatively homogeneous movies (certainly less diversity on the screen than would otherwise be the case).

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