The Canterbury Tales - Wikipedia

Scholars explain that only one of the thirty pilgrims was indeed Chaucer, but other characters in the Canterbury Tales represent the struggles of Chaucer as well.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: Themes

Geoffrey Chaucer used The Canterbury Tales to explore his personal views of this dark time.

“Chaucer’s Criticism of the Catholic Church in The Canterbury Tales.”

The Knight, an honorable, generous, courteous, and noble member of a party of twenty-nine people on a pilgrimage to the English town of Canterbury during the Middle Ages, tells his tale as part of a storyte...

The catholic church and the canterbury tales | Vycom

Talbot Donaldson writes in response to the conclusion of the "Knight’s Tale," one of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, "What it does suggest…is that Providence is not working justly." Though Donaldson correctly points out the fact that the "Knight’s Tale" ends in injustice, he confuses the role of sin in the injustice with the role of God.

In The Canterbury Tales, Chaucer indirectly depicts the characters through the stories they tell.

Banned Books Awareness: “The Canterbury Tales” - …

However, in The Canterbury Tales, the knight is revealed as a character that would now be considered a knight in shining armor, a perfect role model in how he acts and what he does.

Banned Books Awareness: “The Canterbury Tales ..

A woman’s level of recognition in Canterbury Tales are through her class in society, whether she is young and beautiful, or old and disgusting, and her degree of experience in life....

Why inspired Chaucer to write 'The Canterbury Tales'? …

to attack vices, follies, etc." Using that definition, I think that all of the pilgrims in the Canterbury Tales are satirized to some extent; some of the satirizations are more subtle than others.

Chaucer's Irony - The Canterbury Tales - A-Level …

In preparing the reader for the tales, Chaucer first sets the mood by providing an overall idea of the type of character who is telling the tale, then allows that character to introduce themselves through a personal prologue and finally, the pilgrim tells their tale....

In The Canterbury Tales, the Monk acts like he is part of the upper class of society....

The Canterbury Tales is a fun ..

These two women appear similar in the General Prologue of the poem but, as we see through their tales, they are quite unique women and most importantly very different from one another.

Seemingly opposite views exist within the “Retraction” and The Canterbury Tales.

England from the Catholic church.

In "Chaucer's Retraction," which appears at the end of The Canterbury Tales (Norton 311), Chaucer not only apologizes for several of his secular works, he also goes so far as to revoke them, and ask for forgiveness for such work...

The Canterbury Tales shows that people then and people now are not all that different.

The Catholic Church would provide spiritual and ..

Chaucer strongly uses the Knight, the Squire and the Prioress’s clothing to symbolize how their personalities are reflected through The Canterbury Tales.