This will help lay anew foundation of understanding.

Addiction themed ads are a reminder for smokers and a warning for nonsmokers that smoking is very addictive. Whether they realize it yet, once they become addicted, it will be very hard to quit. For smokers, these ads offer support (usually numbers of quit lines) to help smokers quit. They also point out that nicotine is responsible for the addictive qualities of smoking.

Some of you have sent me email asking why am I doing this page.

Iwill talk about how people are herd animals and how nicotine isintroduced into your tribe.

I amtrying to persuade people who don't smoke to not get started.

Also this week, on Friday, the agency’s new nicotine steering committee will hold a public hearing on over-the-counter therapeutic products, among them gums, patches and lozenges, designed to help smokers quit.

This webpage isn't targeted at those who are already smokers.

Cessation was one area where the committee’s report did give the booming e-cigarette industry some good news. It pointed out the benefits for smokers trying to quit. But people who continue to smoke cigarettes, alternating with e-cigarettes, do not gain the same health benefits, the committee said. That’s especially important given that most adults who vape also still smoke or use other tobacco products. The report also said the evidence was limited on whether e-cigarettes were effective for quitting smoking.

I will also talk about how the tobaccoindustry uses sex to get you to smoke.

People of my generation (I'm 43) have a half lifetime of 21 years.

Beaudoin CE. Exploring Antismoking Ads: Appeals, Themes, and Consequences. Journal of Health Communication 2002; 7: 123-137. 2. Goldman LK, Glantz SA. Evaluation of Antismoking Advertising Campaigns. JAMA 1998; 279: 772-777. 3. Pechmann C, Zhao G, Goldberg ME, Reibling ET. What to Convey in Antismoking Advertisements for Adolescents: The Use of Protection Motivation Theory to Identify Effective Message Themes. Journal of Marketing 2003; 67: 1-18. 4. Schar E, Gutierrez K, Murphy-Hoefer R, Nelson DE. Tobacco Use Prevention Media Campaigns: Lessons Learned from Youth in Nine Countries. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on smoking and Health; 2006.

We are past the age whereit is obvious that smoking is a bad idea.

Dr Joel Nitzkin, Chair of the Tobacco Control Task Force for the American Association of Public Health Physicians, believes the hazards posed by e-cigarettes would be much lower than one percent of that posed by smoking tobacco cigarettes.

In fact, the :

"Substances in the cigarette smoke, other than the nicotine, inhaled deep into the lung, cause most of the tobacco-attributable illness and death in the United States."

As our parents generation scrolls off the top of the screen,my generation is now coming into power.

And I am definitelynot part of a religious group.

And it is now our turn to takeresponsibility for sending a new message into the future so that someday that your children won't grow up in a Nicobrain world.

Compare that partial list with chemicals and compounds in e-cigarette vapours

And for the mostpart, that's about all you know.

The effectiveness of addiction-themed anti-smoking ads among youth varies depending on the delivery of the theme. Youth are not receptive to ads that warn of addiction by smoking. They have just started smoking, and they smoke primarily for social reasons, not because they crave it. They are not yet addicted, so they think they can quit before they are affected or find it hard to believe these claims can apply to them (4). Pechmann 2003 demonstrates that exposure to these ads do increase the perceptions of health risk severity, but this change in awareness does not lead to reduced intentions to smoke because there is still low perception of vulnerability (3).

I don't know what to tell you because that is beyondthe realm of my experience.

At least that's the wayit seemed when I was a teenager.

Beaudoin CE. Exploring Antismoking Ads: Appeals, Themes, and Consequences. Journal of Health Communication 2002; 7: 123-137. 2. Goldman LK, Glantz SA. Evaluation of Antismoking Advertising Campaigns. JAMA 1998; 279: 772-777. 3. Pechmann C, Zhao G, Goldberg ME, Reibling ET. What to Convey in Antismoking Advertisements for Adolescents: The Use of Protection Motivation Theory to Identify Effective Message Themes. Journal of Marketing 2003; 67: 1-18. 4. Schar E, Gutierrez K, Murphy-Hoefer R, Nelson DE. Tobacco Use Prevention Media Campaigns: Lessons Learned from Youth in Nine Countries. Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on smoking and Health; 2006.