Being able to read is critical to a child’s educational success.

"''The four stanzas, beginning 'Yet even these bones,' are to me original: I have never seen the notions in any other place: yet he that reads them here persuades himself that he has always felt them.'' Johnson (cf. Boswell's Johnson, 1775, aetat. 66).
Johnson's comment well illustrates Pope's line in the Essay on Criticism: 'What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed' which gives us briefly the aim and achievement of the best 18th century poetry."

Berry's On Reading Poems to a Senior Class at South High

Reading is not just for entertainment, it is also used to acquire information.

It is used to increase reading efficiency, speed, and comprehension.

"The 'Epitaph' was perhaps inspired by the inscription in the church in Mallet, The Excursion i 299-311: 'Lamented shade! whom every gift of heaven / Profusely blest: all learning was his own. / Pleasing his speech , by nature taught to flow, / Persuasive sense and strong, sincere and clear. / His manners greatly plain; a noble grace, / Self-taught, beyond the reach of mimic art, / Adorn'd him: his calmer temper winning mild; / Nor pity softer, nor was truth more bright. / Constant in doing well, he neither sought / Nor shunned applause. No bashful merit sighed / Near him neglected: sympathising he / Wiped off the tear from sorrow's clouded eye / With kindly hand, and taught her heart to smile.' Cp. also the epitaph at the end of Hammond's Elegy ix 41-4: 'Here lies a youth, borne down with love and care, / He could not long his Delia's loss abide, / Joy left his bosom with the parting fair, / And when he durst no longer hope, he died.'"

Mongolian Ambassador presentscredentials to President U Htin Kyaw...

"The 'Epitaph' was perhaps inspired by the inscription in the church in Mallet, The Excursion i 299-311: 'Lamented shade! whom every gift of heaven / Profusely blest: all learning was his own. / Pleasing his speech , by nature taught to flow, / Persuasive sense and strong, sincere and clear. / His manners greatly plain; a noble grace, / Self-taught, beyond the reach of mimic art, / Adorn'd him: his calmer temper winning mild; / Nor pity softer, nor was truth more bright. / Constant in doing well, he neither sought / Nor shunned applause. No bashful merit sighed / Near him neglected: sympathising he / Wiped off the tear from sorrow's clouded eye / With kindly hand, and taught her heart to smile.' Cp. also the epitaph at the end of Hammond's Elegy ix 41-4: 'Here lies a youth, borne down with love and care, / He could not long his Delia's loss abide, / Joy left his bosom with the parting fair, / And when he durst no longer hope, he died.'"

Reading is essential for human communication and increasing knowledge.

"Arthur Johnston, Selected Poems of [...]" R. Lonsdale, 1969.

"''The four stanzas, beginning 'Yet even these bones,' are to me original: I have never seen the notions in any other place: yet he that reads them here persuades himself that he has always felt them.'' Johnson (cf. Boswell's Johnson, 1775, aetat. 66).
Johnson's comment well illustrates Pope's line in the Essay on Criticism: 'What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed' which gives us briefly the aim and achievement of the best 18th century poetry."

"Arthur Johnston, Selected Poems of [...]" R. Lonsdale, 1969.

"''The four stanzas, beginning 'Yet even these bones,' are to me original: I have never seen the notions in any other place: yet he that reads them here persuades himself that he has always felt them.'' Johnson (cf. Boswell's Johnson, 1775, aetat. 66).
Johnson's comment well illustrates Pope's line in the Essay on Criticism: 'What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed' which gives us briefly the aim and achievement of the best 18th century poetry."

"Arthur Johnston, Selected Poems of [...]" R. Lonsdale, 1969.

"''The four stanzas, beginning 'Yet even these bones,' are to me original: I have never seen the notions in any other place: yet he that reads them here persuades himself that he has always felt them.'' Johnson (cf. Boswell's Johnson, 1775, aetat. 66).
Johnson's comment well illustrates Pope's line in the Essay on Criticism: 'What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed' which gives us briefly the aim and achievement of the best 18th century poetry."