odds of teenage pregnancy essays

Your daughter's health care provider will probably recommend that she take on pregnancy, giving birth, and parenting. These classes (some of which are held just for teens) can help prepare her for the practical side of parenthood by teaching skills such as feeding, diapering, child safety, and other basic baby care techniques.

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N2 - CONTEXT: Previous research suggests a link between adolescent pregnancy and sexual abuse history but most studies have used clinical samples of females only and single measures of abuse. METHODS: Associations between pregnancy involvement, risk behaviors and sexual abuse were examined in sexually experienced teenagers from the Minnesota Student Surveys of 1992 (N=29, 187) and 1998 (N=25, 002). Chi-square tests assessed differences in pregnancy involvement and related risk behaviors among four groups of adolescents, categorized by type of abuse experienced: none, incest only, nonfamilial only of both. Odds ratios for pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors, adjusted for grade level and race, were calculated for each gender by using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Sexual abuse was reported by 6% of males and 27% of females in 1992, and by 9% and 22% in 1998. Reports of pregnancy involvement were significantly more common among abused adolescents (13-26% of females and 22-61% of males, depending on type of abuse) than among nonabused adolescents (8-10%). Abused adolescents were more likely than others to report risk behaviors, and teenagers reporting both abuse types had the highest odds of pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors. The differential in the odds of pregnancy involvement and most behaviors was larger between nonabused and abused males than between nonabused and abused females. CONCLUSIONS: Teenage pregnancy risk is strongly linked to sexual abuse, especially for males and those who have experienced both incest and nonfamilial abuse. To further reduce the U.S. teenage pregnancy rate, the pregnancy prevention needs of these groups must be adequately addressed.

Pregnancy, parenting support and services for D.C. women

Your teen's health care provider can tell her what to expect during her pregnancy, how to take care of herself and her growing baby, and how to prepare for life as a parent.

03/07/2013 · Uganda’s rate of teenage pregnancy is worryingly among the highest in the world. 24% of all female teenagers are either pregnant or have given birth already.
Why I faked a teenage pregnancy: How the story of one girl's 'social experiment' has been brought to life in TV movie. By Associated …

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Teen Parent Empowerment Program ()
We provide comprehensive health, education, and support services to young adults ages 13-21, equipping them to be responsible parents, prevent repeat pregnancies, complete high school or a GED program, continue with college, careers, or other post-high school options, and move them out of the cycle of poverty.

★ Pregnancy 7 Weeks 4 Days - How To Improve Odds Of Getting Pregnant Pregnancy 7 Weeks 4 Days Teenage Pregnancy Facts …

Teenage Dating for Girls – Part I | Theresa Thomas

CONTEXT: Previous research suggests a link between adolescent pregnancy and sexual abuse history but most studies have used clinical samples of females only and single measures of abuse. METHODS: Associations between pregnancy involvement, risk behaviors and sexual abuse were examined in sexually experienced teenagers from the Minnesota Student Surveys of 1992 (N=29, 187) and 1998 (N=25, 002). Chi-square tests assessed differences in pregnancy involvement and related risk behaviors among four groups of adolescents, categorized by type of abuse experienced: none, incest only, nonfamilial only of both. Odds ratios for pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors, adjusted for grade level and race, were calculated for each gender by using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Sexual abuse was reported by 6% of males and 27% of females in 1992, and by 9% and 22% in 1998. Reports of pregnancy involvement were significantly more common among abused adolescents (13-26% of females and 22-61% of males, depending on type of abuse) than among nonabused adolescents (8-10%). Abused adolescents were more likely than others to report risk behaviors, and teenagers reporting both abuse types had the highest odds of pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors. The differential in the odds of pregnancy involvement and most behaviors was larger between nonabused and abused males than between nonabused and abused females. CONCLUSIONS: Teenage pregnancy risk is strongly linked to sexual abuse, especially for males and those who have experienced both incest and nonfamilial abuse. To further reduce the U.S. teenage pregnancy rate, the pregnancy prevention needs of these groups must be adequately addressed.

Learn more about teenage pregnancy statistics and facts as well as the consequences of teen pregnancy. Knowledge is power when it comes to teen pregnancy prevention.

The Teen Years: 9 Cringe-Inducing Realizations - Wait …

AB - CONTEXT: Previous research suggests a link between adolescent pregnancy and sexual abuse history but most studies have used clinical samples of females only and single measures of abuse. METHODS: Associations between pregnancy involvement, risk behaviors and sexual abuse were examined in sexually experienced teenagers from the Minnesota Student Surveys of 1992 (N=29, 187) and 1998 (N=25, 002). Chi-square tests assessed differences in pregnancy involvement and related risk behaviors among four groups of adolescents, categorized by type of abuse experienced: none, incest only, nonfamilial only of both. Odds ratios for pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors, adjusted for grade level and race, were calculated for each gender by using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Sexual abuse was reported by 6% of males and 27% of females in 1992, and by 9% and 22% in 1998. Reports of pregnancy involvement were significantly more common among abused adolescents (13-26% of females and 22-61% of males, depending on type of abuse) than among nonabused adolescents (8-10%). Abused adolescents were more likely than others to report risk behaviors, and teenagers reporting both abuse types had the highest odds of pregnancy involvement and risk behaviors. The differential in the odds of pregnancy involvement and most behaviors was larger between nonabused and abused males than between nonabused and abused females. CONCLUSIONS: Teenage pregnancy risk is strongly linked to sexual abuse, especially for males and those who have experienced both incest and nonfamilial abuse. To further reduce the U.S. teenage pregnancy rate, the pregnancy prevention needs of these groups must be adequately addressed.