Ambrose studied theology with Simplician, a presbyter of Rome

Visit three of Rome’s most important monuments: the fastidiously-engineered Pantheon, and the archaic Santa Maria in Via Lata, where Saint Paul is claimed to have spent two years under house arrest, the Stadium of Domitian at the underground of the magnificent Navona square.

Emperors of the Roman Empire - Ancient Rome for Kids

Even after they were long gone, there was the remarkable visit of  to Italy and to Rome, in 663.

Rome was an Empire for over 500 years

Visit three of Rome’s most important monuments: the fastidiously-engineered Pantheon, and the archaic Santa Maria in Via Lata, where Saint Paul is claimed to have spent two years under house arrest…

During this time there were over 140 different emperors

The most important magistrates were two . They were appointed for a period of one year, and gave their name to the year. They presided over the city council. They acted as judges, but could not pass sentence of death, which could only be done in Rome. Therefore the symbols of their power were not (a bundle of rods and an axe), but (rods without an axe). The were supported by two , who supervised the markets, the standard weights and measures, and public facilities. Finances were in the hands of two . The city treasure was stored in the basement of the Capitolium. In the second century a new official is found, the , who oversaw public buildings and the water supply. From the period of Trajan the took care of poor children.

Rome (/ r oʊ m / ROHM; Italian: Roma ( listen), Latin: Rōma) is the capital of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale).Rome also serves as …

Joan's Rome | by EWTN's Rome Bureau Chief Joan Lewis

Relatively few ruins have been excavated in Portus, partly because the area was private property of the Torlonia family. A fresco by A. Danti in the Vatican shows the ruins that could still be seen in 1582. Important descriptions were published by Carlo Fea and Antonio Nibby, in 1824 and 1829. Carlo Ludovico Visconti was in charge of excavations in the years 1864-1867, but all that was recorded were the statues that were found, and the ruins were covered with earth after the excavation. Rodolfo Lanciani published a description in 1868. Jerome Carcopino carried out excavations in 1907. Trajan's basin was restored in 1923. In 1935 the first monograph appeared, written by Giuseppe Lugli.

by EWTN's Rome Bureau Chief Joan Lewis

After the Second World War the series "Scavi di Ostia" was published. Excavations continued on a very small scale. In 1960 a monumental, historical study about Ostia was published: "Roman Ostia", by Russell Meiggs (second edition 1973). A detailed archaeological guide, written by Carlo Pavolini, was published in 1983. Excellent studies were written by Fausto Zevi. The on-line Ostia bibliography contained c. 1800 titles in 2003. Recently geophysical research by the German Archaeological Institute and the American Academy in Rome (Michael Heinzelmann and Archer Martin) provided a wealth of information about the unexcavated area, and led to several important discoveries, such as that of Constantine's Basilica, and of a small harbour in the north-west part of the city. Similar geophysical research also took place in Portus by the University of Southampton (Simon Keay). The final publications of this research in Ostia and Portus will appear soon.

Rome (/ r oʊ m / ROHM; Italian: Roma ( listen), Latin: Rōma) is the capital of Italy and a special comune (named Comune di Roma Capitale)

Religion in Ancient Rome - Crystalinks

Yet Justinian's very existence is an anomaly, and the reflective person must feel some conceptual dissonance to be standing in a church in Italy, looking at images of a Roman Emperor and Empress from the 6th century, and yet maintain the view that Rome "fell" in the 5th.

Key Distinctions for Value Theories, and the Importance …

limits to growth: a report to the club of rome - Die Off

It is no coincidence that this kind of metaphysical notion wasa nursemaid to the industrial revolution, nor that it is part andparcel of modern economics. Adam Smith certainly intended theInvisible Hand to serve as a metaphysical, divine principle,which effortlessly took over the role of Divine Providence, onwhich western humanity had focused its aspirations until theEnlightenment. The Enlightenment blocked this Providence, becauseit called for science, technology, and mechanization, and thusdistracted attention from God's will. By introducing theinvisible hand, Smith took up the deistic thread once more; nowthe economy too, or precisely the economy, was to be driven bysupernatural laws, and in the industrial age, too, the role ofGod would remain of decisive importance.

TAKING NATURE INTO ACCOUNT: A Report to the Club of Rome Wouter Van Dieren, Editor;

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Not only did Constantine begin to institute Christianity, but the city of Rome itself had along the way assumed a very secondary importance in the life of the state.