How the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic changed Alabama - …

SPANISH FLU OF 1918 WAS CAUSED BY VACCINATIONS …

Influenza arrived on the Mendocino Coast in the fall of 1918 and did not clear out until the early months of 1919. Mendocino was hit first, followed by Fort Bragg. Then as now, many people had family members or friends living in the larger cities, such as San Francisco and Oakland, where conditions aiding transmission of the disease meant that there were more cases.

The first cases of flu in 1918 were not actually reported in Spain!

The Influenza pandemic of 1918 caused more deaths than the four years of the Bubonic Plague

Flu on the Mendocino Coast: the 1918 influenza epidemic

The war brought the virus back into the US for the second wave of the epidemic. It first arrived in Boston in September of 1918 through the portbusy with war shipments of machinery and supplies. The war also enabledthe virus to spread and diffuse. Men across the nation were mobilizing tojoin the military and the cause. As they came together, they brought thevirus with them and to those they contacted. The virus killed almost200,00 in October of 1918 alone. In November 11 of 1918 the end of the war enabled a resurgence. As people celebrated Armistice Day with paradesand large partiess, a complete disaster from the standpoint, a rebirth of the epidemic occurred in some cities. The flu that winter was beyondimagination asmillions were infected and thousands died. Just as the war had effectedthe course of influenza, influenza affected the war. Entire fleets wereill with the disease and men on the front were too sick to fight. Theflu was devastating to both sides, killing more men than their ownweapons could.

Secret of the 1918 Spanish flu epidemic uncovered | …

As we cross the threshold of 2018, the centenary of both the conclusion of WWI and the influenza epidemic, it is perhaps fitting that we revisit this topic.

04/05/2009 · Roy Braswell was 9 years old when the flu pandemic of 1918 hit.

More than 12,000 Philadelphians died in the flu …

The pandemic affected everyone. With one-quarter of the US andone-fifth of the world infected with the influenza, it was impossible toescape from the illness. Even President Woodrow Wilson suffered from theflu in early 1919 while negotiating the crucial treaty of Versailles toend the World War (Tice). Those who were lucky enough to avoid infectionhad to deal with the public health ordinances to restrain the spread ofthe disease. The public health departments distributed to be worn in public. Storescould not hold sales, funerals were limited to 15 minutes. Some townsrequired a signed certificate to enter and railroads would not acceptpassengers without them. Those who ignored the flu ordinances had to paysteep fines enforced by extra officers (Deseret News). Bodiespilled up as the massive deaths of the epidemic ensued. Besides the lackof health care workers and medical supplies, there was a shortage ofcoffins, morticians and gravediggers (Knox). The conditions in 1918 werenot so far removed from the Black Death in the era of the bubonicplague of the Middle Ages. In 1918-19 this deadly influenza pandemic erupted duringthe final stages of World War I. Nations were already attempting to deal with the effects and costs of the war. Propaganda campaigns and warrestrictions and rations had been implemented by governments. Nationalismpervaded as people accepted government authority. This allowed thepublic health departments to easily step in and implement theirrestrictive measures. The war also gave science greater importance asgovernments relied on scientists, now armed with the new germ theory andthe development of antiseptic surgery, to design vaccines and reducemortalities of disease and battle wounds. Their new technologies couldpreserve the men on the front and ultimately save the world. Theseconditions created by World War I, togetherwith the current social attitudes and ideas, led to the relatively calmresponse of the public and application of scientific ideas. Peopleallowed for strict measures and loss of freedom during the war as theysubmitted tothe needs of the nation ahead of their personal needs. They had acceptedthe limitations placed with rationing and drafting. Theresponses of the public health officialsreflected the new allegiance to science and the wartime society. Themedical and scientific communities had developed new theories and appliedthem to prevention, diagnostics and treatment of the influenza patients.

Influenza (Flu) | Seasonal Influenza (Flu) | CDC

The pandemic affected everyone. With one-quarter of the US andone-fifth of the world infected with the influenza, it was impossible toescape from the illness. Even President Woodrow Wilson suffered from theflu in early 1919 while negotiating the crucial treaty of Versailles toend the World War (Tice). Those who were lucky enough to avoid infectionhad to deal with the public health ordinances to restrain the spread ofthe disease. The public health departments distributed to be worn in public. Storescould not hold sales, funerals were limited to 15 minutes. Some townsrequired a signed certificate to enter and railroads would not acceptpassengers without them. Those who ignored the flu ordinances had to paysteep fines enforced by extra officers (Deseret News). Bodiespilled up as the massive deaths of the epidemic ensued. Besides the lackof health care workers and medical supplies, there was a shortage ofcoffins, morticians and gravediggers (Knox). The conditions in 1918 werenot so far removed from the Black Death in the era of the bubonicplague of the Middle Ages.

Have You Ever Wondered Why We Call the 1918 Epidemic …

In 1918-19 this deadly influenza pandemic erupted duringthe final stages of World War I. Nations were already attempting to deal with the effects and costs of the war. Propaganda campaigns and warrestrictions and rations had been implemented by governments. Nationalismpervaded as people accepted government authority. This allowed thepublic health departments to easily step in and implement theirrestrictive measures. The war also gave science greater importance asgovernments relied on scientists, now armed with the new germ theory andthe development of antiseptic surgery, to design vaccines and reducemortalities of disease and battle wounds. Their new technologies couldpreserve the men on the front and ultimately save the world. Theseconditions created by World War I, togetherwith the current social attitudes and ideas, led to the relatively calmresponse of the public and application of scientific ideas. Peopleallowed for strict measures and loss of freedom during the war as theysubmitted tothe needs of the nation ahead of their personal needs. They had acceptedthe limitations placed with rationing and drafting. Theresponses of the public health officialsreflected the new allegiance to science and the wartime society. Themedical and scientific communities had developed new theories and appliedthem to prevention, diagnostics and treatment of the influenza patients.