Comparison of Two Fluid-Management Strategies in …

In informal conversation, superlatives are often used instead of comparatives when comparing two things. For example, when comparing a train journey and car journey to Edinburgh, someone might say: the train is quickest, rather than: the train is quicker. Superlatives are not generally used in this way in formal speech and writing.

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 Explain how to compare and contrast two or more informational texts.

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Thanks for posting this article. I will be using the text in the future. While most students have no difficulty in understanding the rules, they sometimes do not use the comparative forms accurately.
I will be using the text in the future as a way to recycle this topic.

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Participants were simultaneously randomly assigned to receive either a pulmonary-artery catheter or a central venous catheter in a two-by-two factorial design. Eligible patients were intubated and received positive-pressure ventilation, had a ratio of the partial pressure of arterial oxygen (PaO2) to the fraction of inspired oxygen (FO2) of less than 300 (adjusted if the altitude exceeded 1000 m), and had bilateral infiltrates on chest radiography consistent with the presence of pulmonary edema without evidence of left atrial hypertension. If a potential participant did not have a central venous catheter, the primary physician's intent to insert one was required. Reasons for exclusion are listed in the .


Contingency and Action: A Comparison of Two Forms …

Comparison of the articles by Axtell and Merrell Merrell provides documentation of the realities of white and native interaction in the American south-east between roughly 1610 and 1750.

Contingency and Action: A Comparison of Two Forms of Requesting

One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. To do this, we use comparative adjectives, which are formed either by adding -er at the end of the adjective, or placing more before it, e.g.It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind. We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e.g.1. One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est, e.g.2. More and most are sometimes used with one-syllable adjectives as an alternative to the -er/-est form when we particularly want to emphasize the comparison, or if the adjective occurs with another adjective which has more than one syllable, e.g.That sofa might look nice, but this one is more soft and comfortable.
3. Two-syllable adjectives which end in -y usually form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est, (note the change of -y to-i in the comparative/superlative). 4. Two-syllable adjectives ending in -ed, -ing, -ful, or -less always form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
As a general rule, most other two-syllable adjectives also form comparatives and superlatives with more and most, apart from those ending in -y (see point 3 above). However, a few two-syllable adjectives can take either -er/-est or more/most. Here are four examples. 5. Adjectives which have three or more syllables always form the comparative and superlative with more and most.




The only exceptions are some three-syllable adjectives which have been formed by adding the prefix un- to another adjective, especially those formed from an adjective ending in-y. These adjectives can form comparatives and superlatives by using more/most or adding -er/-est.6. The following adjectives have irregular comparative and superlative forms:






The adjectives ill and well, describing bad and good health, have irregular comparative forms. The comparative of ill is worse, and the comparative of well is better, e.g. She’s feeling much better/worse today.The usual comparative and superlative forms of the adjective old are older and oldest. However, the alternative forms elder and eldest are sometimes used. Elder and eldest are generally restricted to talking about the age of people, especially people within the same family, and are not used to talk about the age of things, e.g.Elder cannot occur in the predicative position after link verbs such as be, become, get, e.g.
7. Comparatives and superlatives of compound adjectives are generally formed by using more andmost, e.g.Some compound adjectives have a first element consisting of an adjective which would normally form a comparative or superlative in one word, either by adding -er/-est, or by an irregular form. Such compound adjectives can, therefore form a comparative/superlative by using these changes to the first adjective, rather than by using more/most.8. Some adjectives which already have a comparative or superlative meaning do not usually occur with -er/-est or more/most, unless we want to give special emphasis, often for humorous effect, e.g.Common examples of adjectives like these are: complete, equal, favourite, and perfect.

Just like other adjectives, comparatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, e.g.Comparatives can also occur after be and other link verbs, e.g.Comparatives are very commonly followed by than and a pronoun or noun group, in order to describe who the other person or thing involved in the comparison is, e.g.As well as pronouns and noun groups, than is often followed by other kinds of clause, e.g.Comparatives are often qualified by using words and phrases such as much, a lot,far, a bit/little, slightly, e.g.Two comparatives can be contrasted by placing the before them, indicating that a change in one quality is linked to a change in another, e.g.Two comparatives can also be linked with and to show a continuing increase in a particular quality, e.g.Like comparatives, superlatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, or occur after be and other link verbs, e.g.As shown in the second two examples, superlatives are often used on their own if it is clear what or who is being compared. If you want to be specific about what you are comparing, you can do this with a noun, or a phrase beginning with in or of, e.g.Another way of being specific is by placing a relative clause after the superlative, e.g.Note that if the superlative occurs before the noun, in the attributive position, the in or ofphrase or relative clause comes after the noun, eg.Although the usually occurs before a superlative, it is sometimes left out in informal speech or writing, e.g.However, the cannot be left out when the superlative is followed by an of/inphrase, or a relative clause indicating the group of people or things being compared, e.g.Sometimes possessive pronouns are used instead of the before a superlative, e.g.Ordinal numbers are often used with superlatives to indicate that something has more of a particular quality than most others of its kind, e.g.In informal conversation, superlatives are often used instead of comparatives when comparing two things. For example, when comparing a train journey and car journey to Edinburgh, someone might say: the train is quickest, rather than: the train is quicker. Superlatives are not generally used in this way in formal speech and writing.Comparative and superlative forms with -er/-est and more/most are always used to talk about a quality which is greater in amount relative to others. If we want to talk about a quality which is smaller in amount relative to others, we use the forms less (the opposite of comparative more), and the least (the opposite of superlative the most). Less is used to indicate that something or someone does not have as much of a particular quality as someone or something else, e.g.The least is used to indicate that something or someone has less of a quality than any other person or thing of its kind, e.g.

Native American History -- A Comparison of Two Articles

Two comparatives can be contrasted by placing the before them, indicating that a change in one quality is linked to a change in another, e.g.

Comparison of Two German Language Courses in …

2. More and most are sometimes used with one-syllable adjectives as an alternative to the -er/-est form when we particularly want to emphasize the comparison, or if the adjective occurs with another adjective which has more than one syllable, e.g.

Drugs: Two articles comparison - City University of New …

One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. To do this, we use comparative adjectives, which are formed either by adding -er at the end of the adjective, or placing more before it, e.g.