Bekker (Prussian Academy, 1831-70)

Dr. Granger reports receiving grants from AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, the Medtronic Foundation, Merck, Sanofi-Aventis, Astellas, and the Medicines Company, consulting fees from AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffmann-La Roche, Novartis, Otsuka Pharmaceutical, Sanofi-Aventis, and the Medicines Company, and support from the Medtronic Foundation and Merck for travel, accommodations, or meeting expenses; Dr. Alexander, receiving grants from Merck/Schering-Plough and Regado Biosciences and consulting fees from Merck/Schering-Plough, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ortho-McNeil-Janssen, PolyMedix, Regado Biosciences, and Bayer; Dr. Lopes, receiving grants from Bristol-Myers Squibb, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Daiichi Sankyo and consulting fees from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Hylek, receiving consulting fees from Johnson & Johnson, Boehringer Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Daiichi Sankyo, Merck, Pfizer, and Ortho-McNeil-Janssen and lecture fees from Boehringer Ingelheim; Dr. Hanna, being an employee of Bristol-Myers Squibb and receiving stock as part of his compensation; Dr. Ansell, being a member of Bristol-Myers Squibb's data and safety monitoring boards, receiving consulting fees from Ortho-McNeil-Janssen, Daiichi Sankyo, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Bristol-Myers Squibb, and receiving payments from Daiichi Sankyo for developing educational presentations; Dr. Atar, receiving consulting fees or honoraria from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Avezum, receiving consulting fees from Boehringer Ingelheim and GlaxoSmithKline; Dr. Bahit, receiving consulting fees or honoraria and other research support from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Diaz, receiving consulting fees or honoraria and other research support from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Ezekowitz, receiving research support, honoraria, and payments for continuing medical education events from AstraZeneca, Amgen, Abbott, Servier, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, and Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Flaker, receiving consulting fees from Boehringer Ingelheim and Sanofi-Aventis and grants from Boehringer Ingelheim and Sanofi-Aventis; Dr. Garcia, receiving consulting fees from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Daiichi Sankyo and payments from Boehringer Ingelheim for developing educational presentations; Dr. Geraldes, being an employee of Bristol-Myers Squibb and receiving stock or stock options annually; Dr. Gersh, receiving consulting fees from Ortho-McNeil-Janssen, Amorcyte, Abbott Laboratories, GE Healthcare, St. Jude Medical, Medispec, Merck, and Boston Scientific; Dr. Goto, being a board member of Bristol-Myers Squibb and Sanofi-Aventis, receiving grants from Boehringer Ingelheim, Otuska, Eisai, Sanofi-Aventis, and Daiichi Sankyo, consulting fees from Eisai, lecture fees from Eisai, Otsuka, Daiichi Sankyo, Sanofi-Aventis, Bayer, Novartis, AstraZeneca, Asteras, Pfizer, Medtronics-Japan, Tanabe-Mitsubishi, Takeda, Mochida, and MSD, and payments from Bayer and Sanofi-Aventis for developing educational presentations; Dr. Hermosillo, receiving consulting fees or honoraria from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Hohnloser, receiving consulting fees from Sanofi-Aventis, St. Jude Medical, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cardiome, and Medtronic Vascular and lecture fees from Sanofi-Aventis, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, Boehringer Ingelheim, and St. Jude Medical; Dr. Horowitz, receiving research support from Bristol-Myers Squibb; Dr. Mohan, being an employee of Bristol-Myers Squibb and receiving performance-based stock or stock options annually; Dr. Lewis, being an advisory board member for Bayer Healthcare; Dr. Lopez-Sendon, receiving grants from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Boehringer Ingelheim, and Bayer and consulting fees from Boehringer Ingelheim; Dr. Parkhomenko, receiving consulting fees and grants from Borshchiagovsky Chemical-Pharmaceutical Plant; Dr. Verheugt, receiving lecture fees from Bayer and AstraZeneca and consulting fees from Bayer and Daiichi Sankyo; and Dr. Wallentin, receiving grants from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Schering-Plough, and Merck, consulting fees from Regado Biotechnologies, Portola, CSL Behring, Athera Biotechnologies, Boehringer Ingelheim, AstraZeneca, and GlaxoSmithKline, and lecture fees from Bristol-Myers Squibb, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, GlaxoSmithKline, Schering-Plough, and Merck.

by Jonathan Barnes.(Princeton, 1984)

Thus, the proposes a scheme for in terms of their properties, states, and activities.

by Richard McKeon (Random House, 1941)

The primary and key secondary analyses were performed with the use of the Cox proportional-hazards model, with previous warfarin status and geographic region (North America, South America, Europe, or Asian Pacific) used as strata in the model. The primary and secondary efficacy analyses included all patients who underwent randomization (intention-to-treat population) and included all events from the time of randomization until the cutoff date for efficacy outcomes (predefined as January 30, 2011). The analyses of bleeding events included all patients who received at least one dose of a study drug and included all events from the time the first dose of a study drug was received until 2 days after the last dose was received. In a modified intention-to-treat sensitivity analysis, we analyzed bleeding events that occurred in patients who received at least one dose of a study drug and included all events from the time of randomization until January 30, 2011. All reported P values for noninferiority are one-sided, and all reported P values for superiority are two-sided. All statistical analyses were performed with the use of SAS software, version 9.0 (SAS Institute).

by Terence Irwin and Gail Fine (Hackett, 1996)

The primary noninferiority hypothesis required that apixaban preserve at least 50% of the relative reduction in the risk of stroke or systemic embolism associated with warfarin (62%) in six previous, major randomized, controlled trials. This hypothesis provided a lower 95% confidence interval of 1.88 for the relative risk with placebo as compared with warfarin, and one half of this value was 1.44 (or 1.38 on a log scale). We estimated that with the occurrence of the primary outcome in 448 patients, the study would have 90% power to ensure that the upper boundary of the 99% confidence interval for the relative risk would be less than 1.44 and that the upper boundary of the 95% confidence interval for the relative risk would be less than 1.38, on the assumption that apixaban and warfarin had identical effects. On the basis of the overall event rate during the trial, we planned to recruit 18,000 patients in order to reach this number of events with approximately 2 years of follow-up. An independent data and safety monitoring committee reviewed the accumulating trial data, with one prespecified interim analysis for efficacy.

But on Aristotle's view, the lives of individual human beings are invariably.

by Nancy Sherman (Rowman & Littlefield, 1999)

One of the best-known Greek biographers and essayists, Plutarch wrote extensively about ancient Greek and Roman culture, influencing later Western writers.

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Plato's final years were spent at the Academy and with his writing. The circumstances surrounding his death are clouded, though it is fairly certain that he died in Athens around 348 B.C.E., when he was in his early 80s. Some scholars suggest that he died while attending a wedding, while others believe he died peacefully in his sleep.

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