Blood alcohol content - Wikipedia

In other NHTSA statistics, alcohol-related fatalities for large truck operators declined by almost 60%, the largest such decline noted. Nearly one-third of the pedestrians 16 years or older who were killed by automobiles were intoxicated, i.e., had a BAC of 0.01 g/dl. In 1997, 29% of all fatal crashes that took place on weekdays involved alcohol. This percentage increased to 52% on weekends. For all crashes, the alcoholinvolvement on weekends was 12% and on weekdays, 5%. Alaska had the highest rate of fatal alcohol-related crashes using the FARS criteria and comparing total traffic fatalities to any alcohol involvement. (See Table 1.) Utah had the lowest rate. (See Table 2.)

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

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Cost of Auto Crashes & Statistics

"We believe these laws will have an impact upon alcohol-related traffic fatalities greater than any initiatives that have preceded them," said Brad Falick, executive director of Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD).

Free car accident Essays and Papers - 123HelpMe

Using the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) criteria for Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), it is estimated that an alcohol crash occurs every 32 minutes. NHTSA defines an alcohol-related by a law enforcement agency and involved a vehicle operator or a non-occupant (e.g., pedestrian) with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 grams per deciliter (0.01 g/dl) or greater. In 1997, 16,189 alcohol-related fatalities occurred, 38.6% of the total fatalities for the year.

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One person is injured in a car accident ..

(Wednesday, September 6, 2000) U.S. Transportation Secretary Rodney E. Slater today announced that alcohol-related traffic fatalities dropped again to a new historical low and represented a smaller percentage of the total traffic fatalities, 38 percent in 1999 compared to 39 percent in 1998. Secretary Slater said that later today President Clinton will send a letter to Congress strongly urging them to adopt.08 blood alcohol content as the law of the land.

an increasing number of car accidents ..

* The estimated relative risk of accidental death was 2.5 to 8 times greater among males defined as heavy drinkers or alcohol dependent than among the general population, Alcoholics are nearly 5 times more likely to die in motor vehicle crashes, 16 times more likely to die in falls, and 10 times more likely to become fire or bum victims.

What Causes Car Accidents? - Smart Motorist

Using the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) criteria for Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), it is estimated that an alcohol crash occurs every 32 minutes. NHTSA defines an alcohol-related fatal crash as one that was reported by a law enforcement agency and involved a vehicle operator or a non-occupant (e.g., pedestrian) with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.01 grams per deciliter (0.01 g/dl) or greater. In 1997, 16,189 alcohol-related fatalities occurred, 38.6% of the total fatalities for the year.

Marijuana Legalization: How Has it Affected Driving? - Quoted

In other NHTSA statistics, alcohol-related fatalities for large truck operators declined by almost 60%, the largest such decline noted. Nearly one-third of the pedestrians 16 years or older who were killed by automobiles were intoxicated, i.e., had a BAC of 0.01 g/dl. In 1997, 29% of all fatal crashes that took place on weekdays involved alcohol. This percentage increased to 52% on weekends. For all crashes, the alcohol involvement on weekends was 12% and on weekdays, 5%. Alaska had the highest rate of fatal alcohol-related crashes using the FARS criteria and comparing total traffic fatalities to any alcohol involvement. (See Table 1.) Utah had the lowest rate. (See Table 2.)

Prescription Drugs Now Factor in Higher Percentage of Fatal Car ..

New multistate studies by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration indicate that a combination of stricter laws, including 0.08 percent blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limits, can significantly reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths.